Experience the North and West Self-Drive Tour 8 Day

Experience the North and West Self-Drive Tour 8 Day

7 Night Tour From $917 pps

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This tour arrives into Shannon Airport and departs from Belfast International.

This tour includes part of the Wild Atlantic Way

Attractions on This Tour

Burren Region, County Clare

The Burren, from the Gaelic word Boireann is an area of limestone rock covering imposing majestic mountains, and tranquil valleys with gently meandering streams. With its innate sense of spiritual peace, extraordinary array of flora and wildlife, and megalithic tombs and monuments older than Egypt's pyramids, the Burren creates a tapestry of colour and a seductively magical aura which few people leave without wanting to experience again.

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Burren Region, County Clare

Burren Smokehouse, County Clare

The Burren Smokehouse Visitors Centre was established in 1995, to create a window for the smokehouse own products and other local gourmet products and crafts. It has become a popular tourist attraction in the North County Clare area and welcomes over 30,000 visitors from all over the world each year. Visit the Burren Smokehouse Visitor Centre and get a tasting of the Burren smoked salmon. You can discover mosaics inside and outside the shop, and look at the first kiln that was used when the Burren Smokehouse was first set up.

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Burren Smokehouse, County Clare

Caherconnell Stone Fort, County Clare

Caherconnell Stone Fort, situated 1km (0.6mi) south of Poulnabrone dolmen in the heart of the Burren Ireland, offers you the opportunity to visit an exceptionally well preserved example of the stone forts or stone ringforts, which are to be found in the Burren in Ireland. The fort is in its original state. Its position, overlooking virtually all-surrounding areas suggests a defensive settlement. Ringforts such as Caherconnell are thought to have been inhabited from 400-1200 AD.

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Caherconnell Stone Fort, County Clare

Aillwee Cave, County Clare

In the heart of the Burren in County Clare, perched high on its Burren terraced mountain side with spectacular views of Galway Bay lies Ireland's premier showcave - an experience, which should be part of everyone’s visit to the Burren. Aillwee Cave welcomes you to its underground surprises, a place of wonder, beauty and discovery.

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Aillwee Cave, County Clare

Cliffs of Moher, County Clare

The Cliffs of Moher are one of Ireland's top Visitor attractions in County Clare. The Cliffs are 214m high at the highest point and range for 8 kilometres over the Atlantic Ocean on the western seaboard of Clare. O'Brien's Tower stands proudly on a headland of the majestic Cliffs. From the Cliffs one can see the Aran Islands, Galway Bay, as well as The Twelve Pins, the Maum Turk Mountains in Connemara and Loop Head to the South.

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Cliffs of Moher, County Clare

Doolin Cave, County Clare

Doolin Cave is one of Europe's most compelling cave attractions. It is a truly authentic experience and your only opportunity to see one of the largest free hanging stalactites in the world.

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Doolin Cave, County Clare

Bunratty Castle and Folk Park, County Clare

At Ireland’s premier visitor attraction you are invited to explore three wonderful experiences – the acclaimed 15th Century Bunratty Castle, the 19th century Bunratty Folk Park and the Village Street. The Castle is the most complete and authentic medieval fortress in Ireland. Built in 1425 it was restored in 1954 to its former medieval splendour and now contains mainly 15th and 16th century furnishings, tapestries, and works of art which capture the mood of those times. Today, the castle stands peacefully in delightful grounds.

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Bunratty Castle and Folk Park, County Clare

Bunratty Banquet, County Clare

Bunratty Castle, built in the 15th Century by the Earl of Thomond, stands on the banks of the Rathy River in Clare. During his rule, the Earl was known for hospitality and regularly lavished his guests with entertainment. The Bunratty Medieval Banquet is now held twice nightly throughout the year harking back to the Earl’s extravagant banquets.

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Bunratty Banquet, County Clare

Durty Nelly's, County Clare

Durty Nelly’s is one of Ireland’s most famous pubs and offers a truly unique Irish experience through its history and character. Often copied but never replaced, this truly unique piece of Irish heritage dates back to 1620. Enjoy the craic agus ceoil at the world-renowned Durty Nelly’s where there’s live Traditional Irish music seven nights a week and festivals all year.

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Durty Nelly's, County Clare

Connemara Celtic Crystal, County Galway

Celtic Crystal is situated in the Connemara Gaeltacht (an Irish language speaking area) in the village of Moycullen, 7 mi (12 km) from Galway City. Located on the site of the "old railway station", which formed part of the famous Clifden line, Celtic Crystal was founded in 1972. This family-run business has been pioneering the incorporation of Celtic designs and Gaelic motifs into its ornate Irish Crystal and it is proud to claim leadership in this field.

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Connemara Celtic Crystal, County Galway

Galway City, County Galway

Galway is Ireland's 4th largest city and a hugely popular tourist destination for both Irish and international visitors. The city is vibrant with festivals and events constantly on. There is also a lot cultural interest with literary ties to a number of Ireland's great writers. The local people are incredibly friendly and will help ensure a stop here will never be forgotten.

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Galway City, County Galway

Galway City Museum, Galway City

The Galway Museum is essentially a folk museum and it features a considerable number of artefacts related to the fishing industry, which was, and is an integral part of tradition in the city. The museum aims to provide a cross section of the antiques and implements that were historically used in Galway, reflecting its traditions. Artefacts include farm implements and tools as well as pieces of machinery. There is an impressive collection of military material, including arms.

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Galway City Museum, Galway City

Spanish Arch, Galway City

Thee Spanish Arch built in 1584, stands on the left bank of the River Corrib, where Galway's river meets the sea. The arch is the remainder of a 16th Century bastion, added to the town's walls to protect merchant ships from looting. At this time, it was known as Ceann an Bhalla (Head of the Wall).

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Spanish Arch, Galway City

Galway Cathedral, Galway City

Situated on the banks of the River Corrib in Galway City, Galway Cathedral is the most recently built of Europe's great stone cathedrals, and is the centre of a vibrant community. Galway Cathedral is the seat of the Bishop of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Galway, Kilmacduagh and Kilfenora. The word "cathedral" is derived from the Greek "kathedra", meaning a seat; and indeed this seat is to be found within the sanctuary of the Cathedral.

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Galway Cathedral, Galway City

Trad on the Prom, County Galway

Providing Irish song, dance and music from some of the most talented Irish musicians, dancers and singers in the country this is a showcase of contemporary Irish traditional culture that is not to be missed, with critics hailing it as “the best Irish show of the year”.

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Trad on the Prom, County Galway

Eyre Square, Galway City

Eyre Square was officially renamed Kennedy Memorial Park in 1965 in honour of U.S. President John F. Kennedy, who visited Galway City a short time before his assassination. Now a public park, the plot of land originally took its name from Mayor Edward Eyre who presented the land to the city in 1710.

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Eyre Square, Galway City

Claddagh Region, County Galway

Claddagh (meaning "the stony beach") is an area close to the city centre of Galway, where the Corrib River meets Galway Bay. It was formerly a fishing village, just outside the old city walls. It is just across the river from the Spanish Arch, which was the location of regular fish markets where the locals supplied the city with seafood as recently as the end of the 19th Century. People have been gathering seafood and fishing from the area for millennia.

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Claddagh Region, County Galway

Clifden, County Galway

Clifden, nestled amidst breathtaking mountain scenery and beautiful rugged coastline is one of Ireland's most loved towns. Located in the West of of the county, Clifden is the largest town in Connemara, which of course is an outstanding jewel in Ireland's scenic crown. Below you’ll find information on some of the attractions in this beautiful area.

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Clifden, County Galway

Connemara Region, County Galway

Connemara (in Irish: Conamara), which derives from Conmhaicne Mara (meaning: descendants of Con Mhac, of the sea), is a district in the west of Ireland comprising of a broad peninsula between Killary Harbour and Kilkieran Bay in the west of County Galway or south west Connacht. The Conmhaicne Mara were a branch of the Conmhaicne, an early tribal grouping that had a number of branches located in different parts of Connacht.

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Connemara Region, County Galway

Connemara Marble Factory, County Galway

The mining of Connemara Marble is one of Ireland’s oldest indigenous industries. The Connemara Marble Visitor Center is located at Moycullen, 8 miles west of Galway City on the N59. The marble factory showroom and shop has Ireland's largest display of Connemara Marble jewellery, fashioned in gold and silver depicting the shamrock, harp, Celtic cross and the Claddagh ring.

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Connemara Marble Factory, County Galway

Connemara National Park, County Galway

Connemara National Park is situated in the west of Ireland in County Galway and covers some 2,957 hectares of scenic mountains, expanses of bogs, heaths, grasslands and woodlands. Some of the Park’s mountains, namely Benbaun, Bencullagh, Benbrack and Muckanaght, are part of the famous Twelve Bens or Beanna Beola range which are a dominant feature of the Connemara countryside.

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Connemara National Park, County Galway

Kylemore Abbey, County Galway

Known as Ireland’s most romantic Castle, Kylemore Abbey, located in Connemara, Co. Galway is the No.1 tourist attraction in the West of Ireland. Perfect for a family day out and easily accessible from Galway or Mayo, Kylemore Abbey & Victorian Walled Garden offers visitors scenic photographic opportunities as well as woodland walks, garden tours, fascinating history, beautiful architecture, ample shopping in the craft shop and tempting homemade delights in the restaurant and tea rooms.

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Kylemore Abbey, County Galway

Connemara National Park, County Galway

Connemara National Park is situated in the west of Ireland in County Galway and covers some 2,957 hectares of scenic mountains, expanses of bogs, heaths, grasslands and woodlands. Some of the Park’s mountains, namely Benbaun, Bencullagh, Benbrack and Muckanaght, are part of the famous Twelve Bens or Beanna Beola range which are a dominant feature of the Connemara countryside.

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Connemara National Park, County Galway

Connemara Smokehouse, County Galway

Family owned and run by the Roberts Family since 1979, Connemara Smokehouse is the oldest smokehouse in Connemara and one of the oldest in Western Ireland. It is one of the few remaining smokehouses still specialising in smoking wild Atlantic salmon.

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Connemara Smokehouse, County Galway

Maam Valley, County Galway

The quaint wooded town land of Maam can be found in the Connemara region. In the shadow of the Maamturk Mountains and situated ideally beside some great fishing lakes, this picturesque setting has a somewhat enchanting feel to it with numerous pre-historic and early historic sites scattered around the area.

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Maam Valley, County Galway

Killary Fjord, County Galway

Killary Harbour/An Caoláire Rua is a fjord located in the West of Ireland in the heart of Connemara which forms a natural border between counties Galway and Mayo. It is 16 km (9.94 mi) long and in the centre over 45 m (148 ft.) deep. It is one of three glacial fjords that exist in Ireland, the others being Lough Swilly and Carlingford Lough.

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Killary Fjord, County Galway

Killary Cruises, County Galway

No visit to Connemara would be complete without a visit to Killary Fjord. The nine mile long inlet boasts some of the finest scenery in the West of Ireland, and because of its sheltered nature, its waters are always calm.

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Killary Cruises, County Galway

Ashford Castle Grounds, County Mayo

Ireland’s grandest castle hotel, with a history dating back to the early 13th Century, Ashford Castle is set in 350 acres (142 hectares) of parkland, and anyone who loves beautiful surroundings will be thrilled to visit the gardens and grounds - or maybe even stay there! Grandeur, formality and tranquillity are the essential characteristics, first seen in the approach through well manicured lawns, in the entrance and formal gardens. Once inside you'll find a succession of impressive public rooms that illustrate a long and proud history – panelled walls, oil paintings, balustrades, suits of armour and magnificent fireplaces.

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Ashford Castle Grounds, County Mayo

Westport, County Mayo

Westport is a unique town because of its layout and location. It was planned and designed by the renowned architect Jame Leeson. Situated near Croagh Patrick, Ireland’s most famous mountain and on the shores of Clew Bay, its old world harbor was once a thriving port serving the County of Mayo. Westport is very different in design from any other Irish town. A visit to Westport will confirm its uniqueness.

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Westport, County Mayo

Westport House and Gardens, County Mayo

Westport House & Gardens has 30 rooms and dungeons, extensive gardens and a tree trail, guided tours, original architecture, artwork and antiques, tea Rooms set in the restored old kitchens and four comprehensive exhibitions. It was the home of Grace O’Malley (Granuaile), the Pirate Queen of Connaught. Daily guided tours take place during high season.

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Westport House and Gardens, County Mayo

Croagh Patrick, County Mayo

Croagh Patrick (nicknamed The Reek) located 8 km (5 miles) from Westport in Mayo is a 764 metres tall mountain, which is has become an important pilgrimage site. On the last Sunday of July every year (“Reek Sunday”), the mountain sees 15,000 pilgrims climb to the top. Saint Patrick is said to have fasted on the summit of the great mountain for forty days in the 5th century. Patrick is reputed to have built a church on the summit of Croagh Patrick, however the church that now stands there was built in 1905.

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Croagh Patrick, County Mayo

Céide Fields, County Mayo

The Céide Fields in North Mayo will give you a unique experience. This is not just another archaeological monument or visitor centre. At Céide Fields you can indulge yourself in a vast prehistoric landscape, a natural wild ecology of blanket bog, dramatic cliffs and coastline, and a much acclaimed building, which has received Ireland's most prestigious architectural award.

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Céide Fields, County Mayo

Achill Island, County Mayo

Achill Island is Ireland’s largest offshore island and can be accessed via a road bridge. Once there you’ll find a plethora of activities, sights and breath-taking scenery. The Atlantic Drive for example takes visitors on a 40km round trip that includes the very best of the island’s scenery.

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Achill Island, County Mayo

Knock Shrine, County Mayo

The Story of Knock began on Thursday evening of the 21st August, 1879, Our Lady, St. Joseph and St. John the Evangelist appeared at the south gable of the church at Knock, County Mayo, Ireland. Beside them and a little to their left was an altar with a cross and the figure of a lamb, around which angels hovered.

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Knock Shrine, County Mayo

Glenveagh National Park, County Donegal

Glenveagh National Park is one of six national parks in Ireland. Situated in the Northwest of Co. Donegal, Glenveagh encompasses some 16,000 acres in the heart of the Derryveagh Mountains. Such a great wilderness is the haunt of many interesting plants and animals.

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Glenveagh National Park, County Donegal

Glenveagh Castle and Gardens, County Donegal

Deep in the Derryveagh mountains, there's a piece of Donegal that owes its existence largely to America. Glenveagh castle and its exotic gardens, which rise like an apparition over Lough Veagh, were built in the 19th Century by John George Adair, a man who was born in County Laois, but who made his fortune in the United States.

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Glenveagh Castle and Gardens, County Donegal

Glencolmcille Folk Village Museum, County Donegal

The Folk Village Museum offers an excellent guided tour for visitors. In the tour you will experience life as it was in the 1700’s, 1800's and 1900’s. The thatched cottages are exact replicas of those belonging to that era and are furnished accordingly. Take a look at how our ancestors lived, cooked, the beds they lay on, the tools they used, their means of lighting and heat. For those of you who can trace your ancestors to Ireland, this is an ideal opportunity to see rural life at first hand.

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Glencolmcille Folk Village Museum, County Donegal

Glencolmcille Walks, County Donegal

Glencolmcille is a hills walker’s paradise. The combination of the stunning landscape and sense of isolation make this one truly unique walking experience. The Irish Tourist Board (Board Faille) has designated two specific walking routes in the area as part of their National Walks Network and these are known as the Glencolumcille Loop. The two walks are called “Drum” and “Tower” loop and each share a starting point at Ionad Siúl.

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Glencolmcille Walks, County Donegal

Killybegs Maritime Heritage Centre, County Donegal

On the coastline of Donegal, in the picturesque village of Killybegs, you’ll find the Maritime and Heritage centre. The experience here is twofold, offering visitors the chance to discover Killybegs rich historic ties with both fishing and carpet making.

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Killybegs Maritime Heritage Centre, County Donegal

Fort Dunree, County Donegal

Fort Dunree or Dún Fhraoigh (meaning “Fort of the Heather” was a very important defensive site through the history of the area. For one, it acted as a station for Irish forces during World War II in order to prevent the warring nations from violating the country’s neutrality. In modern times however, it has become better known for the abundance of beautiful scenery that surrounds it as well as the varied wildlife which occupies the territory.

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Fort Dunree, County Donegal

Derry City, County Derry

Derry is a small, beautiful, fully walled city. It has strong ties to many Irish emmigrants who left for America. It is also the UK's City of Culture for 2013.

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Derry City, County Derry

Walled City Heritage Trail, Derry City

Derry, also known as the “Walled City” or the “Maiden City” is one of the longest inhabited places in Ireland. The earliest mentions of the area are in historical references dating back to the 6th Century when a monastery was founded there by the great Irish Saint Columba/Colmcille in 546 AD.

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Walled City Heritage Trail, Derry City

Tower Museum, Derry City

The Tower Museum in Derry City opened its doors in October of 1992 and has won many accolades since. It currently houses two permanent exhibitions: “The Story of Derry” and “ An Armada Shipwreck – La Trinidad Valencera”.

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Tower Museum, Derry City

Guildhall, Derry City

Located on land reclaimed from the River Foyle, Guildhall is a beautiful building just outside the wall of Derry City. The building dates back to 1887, originally costing £19,000 ($31,500) and was officially opened in 1890 as an administrative centre for the Londonderry Corporation.

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Guildhall, Derry City

McGory's Traditional Irish Music Sessions, County Donegal

McGrory’s of Culdaff (estd. 1924), provides the best of food and music in a relaxing setting showing its visitors the highest level of hospitality that Inishowen has to offer. Aside from the bar and restaurant at McGrory’s you’ll also find The Backroom. The Backroom at McGrory’s is a purpose built live music venue that has been hosting quality acts since it first opened.

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McGory's Traditional Irish Music Sessions, County Donegal

Antrim Coast/Glens of Antrim

The Antrim Coastline and Glens offers spectacular views and world renown sites. The highlight of the coast is at The Giant's Causeway which is a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Aside from the Causeway there is lots on offer along the 80 mile route including The Bushmills Whiskey Brewery, top links golf courses and amazing natural beauty.

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Antrim Coast/Glens of Antrim

Giant's Causeway, County Antrim

For centuries countless visitors have marveled at the majesty and mystery of the Giants Causeway. At the heart of one of Europe’s most magnificent coastlines its unique rock formations have, for millions of years, stood as a natural rampart against the unbridled ferocity of Atlantic storms. The rugged symmetry of the columns never fails to intrigue and inspire visitors. To stroll on the Giants Causeway is to voyage back in time.

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Giant's Causeway, County Antrim

Bushmills Distillery, County Antrim

Visit Ireland’s oldest whiskey distillery for the ultimate Bushmills experience. Take a tour of the distillery to watch whiskey making take place and enjoy a wee taster too as the secrets of 400 years of distilling at the home of Irish whiskey are being unlocked.

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Bushmills Distillery, County Antrim

Carrick-a-Rede Rope Bridge, County Antrim

The famous Carrick-a-Rede rope bridge on Antrim’s Causeway Coast is not to be missed when visiting this region. The 30 m (98 ft) deep and 20 m (65 ft) wide chasm that separates Carrick-a-Rede Island from the mainland is traversed by an exhilarating rope bridge, traditionally erected by salmon fishermen. Visitors bold enough to cross the bridge to the rocky island are rewarded with fantastic views, especially of Rathlin and the Scottish Islands.

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Carrick-a-Rede Rope Bridge, County Antrim

Joey Dunlop Memorial Garden, County Antrim

Joey Dunlop (also known as the “King of the Roads” and “Yer Maun” was born in Ballymoney in 1952. This ambitious and courageous man became one of the most successful competitive motorcyclists of all time.

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Joey Dunlop Memorial Garden, County Antrim

Glenarm Castle Estate and Walled Gardens, County Antrim

Glenarm Castle is one of Northern Ireland’s most beautiful estates. For 400 years this estate has been home to the Earls of Antrim and the setting of a glorious Walled Garden. Situated just 40 minutes outside of Belfast City, this is a place of outstanding natural beauty, accented with a fabulous setting of built and rural heritage.

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Glenarm Castle Estate and Walled Gardens, County Antrim

Belfast City, County Antrim

The city of Belfast is divided into four distinct quarters: the Gaeltacht Quarter, the Cathedral Quarter, the Queen’s Quarter and the Titanic Quarter. One after another you’ll be won over by the unique characteristics in each. Although you’ll find diversity in the architecture and the types of attractions in each of these quarters, at their cores you’ll find the same charismatic nature and welcoming charm of the people who live in this fantastic city.

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Belfast City, County Antrim

Belfast Botanic Gardens and Palm House, Belfast City

Belfast’s Botanic Gardens were first established in 1828 and have been open to the public since 1895. Within its confines you’ll find an extensive rose garden and long herbaceous border. Tree enthusiasts are in for a treat with rare oaks (planted in the 1880’s), including the hornbeam-leafed oak. The gardens are less than a ten minute walk from Queen’s University Belfast and have been an important part of Belfast’s Victorian heritage as well as a popular meeting place.

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Belfast Botanic Gardens and Palm House, Belfast City

St. Anne's Cathedral, Belfast City

St. Anne’s Cathedral or Belfast Cathedral is the focal point on Belfast’s Cathedral Quarter. It was constructed around the old parish church of St. Anne. The foundation stone was laid by architect Sir Thomas Drew on the 6th of September 1899, however the old parish church remained in use until the 31st of December 1903. The only feature of the old church which remains is the Good Samaritan window.

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St. Anne's Cathedral, Belfast City

Titanic Belfast, Belfast City

Titanic Belfast is a must see on any visit to Belfast or Northern Ireland. Located in the heart of Belfast, right beside the historic site where the world famous ship was built, this iconic structure offers a truly unique visitor experience. Over six floors you’ll be brought on a state-of-the-art journey through the story of the Titanic and its rich ties with the city of Belfast, from her first conception in the early 1900’s, through to her construction, launch and her famous maiden voyage, which would tragically become her last.

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Titanic Belfast, Belfast City

Titanic's Dock and Pumphouse, Belfast City

Discover the story behind Belfast’s maritime magic at the site of the Thompson Dry-Dock and Pump-House, once the beating heart of Harland & Wolff during the construction of the great White Star Liners – the Britannic, Olympic and most famously, the Titanic.

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Titanic's Dock and Pumphouse, Belfast City

Ulster Folk and Transport Museum, County Down

Take a journey through time and discover what life was life 100 years ago. Cottages, farms, schools and shop from eras long gone by have been recreated here for you to explore. Amidst the beautiful parkland of the Folk Museum you will find yourself chatting to costumed visitors demonstrating traditional crafts. Whilst in the Transport Museum you can climb on and off majestic steam locomotives or experience the sensation of flight.

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Ulster Folk and Transport Museum, County Down

Belfast Gaeltacht Experience, Belfast City

From humble beginnings in 1991 and the opening of Cultúrlann when it accommodated only pupils, the centre has since evolved into a shining beacon at the centre of Belfast’s Gaeltacht Quarter. The small programme of events and courses began to grow and today the centre produces a full calendar music sessions, concerts, poetry readings, workshops, céilís and children’s art programmes, to name a few.

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Belfast Gaeltacht Experience, Belfast City

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